Saturday, January 15, 2011

Saturday Man Movies

It just doesn't pay to underestimate a man who knows how to use his weapons.

Not if it's Robert Duvall with a rifle.




Or Tom Selleck with a revolver.

10 comments:

  1. Thanks
    Tom Selleck..
    In Quigley Down Under
    One of my favorites....

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  2. Quigley Down Under was at least as good and perhaps a better movie than its contemporary, .

    Many have suggested that the Sharps was the star of the show, and I think it gets high billing.

    However, if I'd been casting, it'd been a Creedmore-style Rolling Block instead. Slimmer action, faster [co-axial] lock time.

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  3. Great movies, the Duval shot it doable, the Quigley shots not so much... :-)

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  4. Quigley. Yeah. Now there's a real woman's movie.

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  5. I dunno NFO, the shots of Quigley shooting the pail as the guy rides out of sight - well, yeah, that's artistic license. Although hits at stationary targets at that range were probably routinely made at Creedmoor.

    But what then to make of a guy shooting, and missing, Duvall with a long range rifle, and Duvall taking him out with a low-power carbine? Doable, sure. But in most such contests, the money's on the Sharps.

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  6. It's my understanding that the Lonesome Dove shot was based on a true story of a shot taken by a Texas Ranger.

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  7. A couple of classics. Gus McRae may be the best Western character of all time. The shot was very doable. The first couple of rounds at the regular sight setting gave a calibration to determine the distance to the target to set his sight. Very doable.

    The revolver shot, with a strange gun? Not so much.

    Best scene from Dove is Call and Gus going into the bar and demanding a little respect! Sometimes we old guys are like that in Texas.

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  8. The Donald- I've seen good shots (me included) completely miss a target at range, simply because we missed the wind. Duvall (if it had been real) would have been watching the strikes and taken the wind vector into account; but yeah that would have been a hard shot, combining a good bit of luck with a steady hand. :-)

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  9. Me, I just re-read my first comment and realized I'd made a couple of errors.

    One, the reference to Quigley's contemporary movie was Dances With Wolves. I preferred Selleck's film to Costner's.

    Second, I veered off track and was thinking of Quigley's riflework, not his pistolero prowess. Would have to agree with Raz that shooting an unfamiliar hogleg accurately and quickly is quite a stretch.

    To wit, I took my two younger kids to the range today - was shooting falling plates with the Single-Six. Seems like on each string, it took the first couple of shots for these old eyes to be able to focus on the front sights and start hitting the plates...

    Daughter (9) continues to make Daddy proud with 6/6 strings with the Marlin 39, and also shot very respectably at paper at 50 yards.

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