Thursday, March 20, 2014

At my limit here.

See Belle.
See the fence.
See Belle on the outside, looking in.
Bad Belle.
See Murphy's Law pulling his hair out.

22 comments:

  1. I've had problems with a fence like that. Dog noses under it and as soon as they are through, it springs back into place. Made it very hard to figure out where they were getting out.

    I used wire cattle panels to stop it. Cut it in half and wire it to the existing fence.

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  2. Hey Murphy,

    I had a similar problem, I had some serious escape artist dogs. I had tried everything except paw amputation and was considering that option. What i did was get a ditch witch that you would use for running cable underground, ran a line 6 inches deep, dropped the fence in the 6" line and had no problem, the fence being 6 inches underground deterred the digging. The fence you have from the photo has a lot of flex so Belle can start a small hole then squeeze under it. I had that problem with the old fence.
    Hope this helps

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    Replies
    1. And that's the problem. Once she finds a spot to get her nose under, she's gone.

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  3. Run a strand of wire, and a fence charger...they will learn really really quick.

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  4. In a previous life I had a fence like that. It slowed the dogs up for oh, about a week. What everyone above said. The fence is the weak point. ALL of it.

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    1. Seeing that. Last two Shepherds were jumpers. This one is a burrower and a merely high fence doesn't keep her in.

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  5. She may be a bad Belle, but she sure is a beautiful Belle shimmering under the sunlight there. So glad all your snow finally melted. I know you guys got tons of it recently.

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  6. It never stops. I really don't think that she thinks that she's doing anything wrong..

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  7. Haha

    Better you than me.

    Now you know why she was a rescue. She just needs more attention than other dogs.
    You need to consider "telecommuting".
    *snicker*

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  8. She's such a pretty girl. What some pit bull people recommend, is to buy the wireless fence set up, and set it up approximately six inches on the inside perimeter of the fence. She gets close to the fence she gets a zap. Can't help but wonder if this is why she was at the pound.

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    1. She was at the pound because an asshole could not or would not take care of her. And all she seems to want to do when she digs out of the pen is come in the house where I'm at. Silly dog.

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  9. Leash on a cable run? Replacing fences is expensive.

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    1. Ruled that out two dogs ago. Way too many trees for it to hang up on.

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  10. At least she is no destructive. My Dalmatian many years ago went through that kind of fence. He would worry it until it broke then expand the hole. Once neutered he never went anywhere but he would not be contained. Over, under, around or through, he was coming out. It would sound like a construction zone.

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  11. Are you sure she isn't climbing over the fence? Our white GSD has climbed up and over 8' chain-link fences. We ended up with an "invisible fence" to keep him in. Now all we need to do is to convince him to stop opening unlocked doors!

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    1. Pretty sure. I've actually seen her crawl under before, and I've watched her try to crawl back in, plus when I get her back, she's usually muddy.

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  12. No suggestions but GOOD LUCK! I've got a white GSD who's an escape artist extraordinaire. When I adopted him, they warned me that he'd been getting out of the 8' kennels at the animal shelter. I thought he'd settle down... Ha! Two years later, he is GONE if I even blink... We've raised the tops of the fences, tried running an electric fence along the inside of our existing fence, tried an invisible fence in his favorite places to jump, and even worked with him extensively with a shock collar trying to teach him that GOING OVER THE FENCE IS A BAD THING... And he still can't be allowed outside unless one of us is directly supervising him or he's placed on a tie out.... :-(

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  13. I'll second the trench and buried fence. That being said, you have a lot of trees. We had success keeping foxes (champion diggers) and dogs Out of a chicken pen by bending the edge of the fence and running a foot wide section flat on the ground, solidly pinned down. It would be a bore to retrofit, but an apron of that type might work, if you could solidly join the fence to the apron. I'd be a bit concerned about sharp edges though, so I might use erosion control fencing, plastic, unless she chews....

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  14. Perhaps you could work this to your advantage Murph. I'm picturing a canine version of The Great Escape. I'll have my people get in touch with your people.

    She IS one pretty pooch.

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  15. Electric chainsaw.

    Buy it used, well used, and cheap; doesn't have to be sharp. It will be disposable. Use it to cut a slot in the dirt as deep as the bar is long. Most of 'em are about a foot, that's plenty. Fence goes into the slot. You'll need about 7 hands for that, call friends. When done, throw out the saw. It will have earned it.

    The fence will rust out in 2-3 years, that's sufficient time for her to become discouraged.

    Or learn to dig real deep.......

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    Replies
    1. Way too many rocks and tree roots in the ground here for any kind of digging.

      But on the positive side, I think I've beaten her, finally. I moved a lot of rocks and dirt yesterday and she didn't get out today.

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