Thursday, June 26, 2014

San Diego, and OldAFSarge gets me in trouble.

One of the things I did when I got to the Left Coast on a Saturday morning a couple of weeks back was tour the USS Midway (CV-41), which is now a permanent museum ship in San Diego.
The ship was insanely crowded, and a pretty expensive tour considering that I also had to pay for car parking nearby, and I wasn't happy to see 95%+ of the ship was off limits. (Basically you could see the hangar deck, the flight deck and a select few compartments below.)
But what I did like were the aircraft on display on the flight deck, including but not limited to the F-4 Phantoms there. (They have two.) And here, dear readers, is where blogger OldAFSarge got me in trouble.
You see, a few months back, he wrote about the boarding ladders on the Phantom.

Now me being the curious sort, and afflicted with a terminal case of Touchus da Forbidinous, I just had to investigate these Phantoms more closely based on what he'd said. So when no one was looking...

Nope. That's a step.

Those open the cockpits, but I'm betting that there's power required.

That's not it, but it does look interesting.

THIS one looks tempting. If I recall, I pull it back six feet and then something neat is supposed to happen.

Ah! Here we go. A button. Let's see what happens when I press it...

"KA-THUNK! KA-THUNK!"

Geez, that was loud. An entire docent-led tour nearby stopped and turned to stare at me as the docent stated the obvious: "Sounds like someone is playing with things that they're not supposed to touch!"

But I'm at my best when under pressure, and I thought quickly. Very quickly.

"Yeah," I replied, pointing across the flight deck. "He went that-a-way!"

At least the tour group laughed.


I did put it back in it's stowed position though.

And of course I had to go check the other Phantom of the flight deck.
Yeah, that one dropped, too.

After that though, it seemed like everywhere I went, there was a docent or two close by. But I'm sure that was just a coincidence. And if it wasn't, I blame Old AF Sarge.

20 comments:

  1. Snerk... People like you are reason all the stuff that goes BOOM is disconnected...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I know. They didn't really appreciate my inquisitiveness at the Kennedy Space Center tour of Mission Control, either. Heck, I said I was sorry.

      Delete
  2. Hold out your hand - while we swat it with an arresting gear.

    I was a docent/ attack dog at a Long Beach airshow. One yahoo kept trying to get into the DC-2. I kept telling him no. Was that you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope, but only because I've never been to Long Beach. A DC-2 would be neat to see, though.

      Delete
    2. http://www.smugmug.com/photos/i-cCz4GMf/0/L/i-cCz4GMf-L.jpg

      Delete
    3. From the same AOPA Fly-In at Long Belch.

      Standouts were the B-29 and F7F.

      http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/14643052_mgQvF3

      Delete
  3. Obviously, since you would've mentioned it if you didn't, you were standing off to the side when you pushed the button. So, Sarge provided you with a little knowledge, and as we all know, a little knowledge is dangerous. Clearly Sarge was at fault.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Damn Skippy! I was just wearing a pair of light shorts, not a flight suit. I chose to skip the ritual greeting that the F-4 apparently gives to the unwary, thanks to Sarge, of course.

      Delete
  4. Heh! Well done! Lets try the 1MC on BB-55 sometime!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We finally got the 1MC working on the Iowa.....

      Delete
  5. After all you did say I am sorry.
    What more did they want a pint of blood?

    ReplyDelete
  6. And remember Cdr. George Chamberlain Duncan and his landing on the Midway. One LUCKY jetjocky!

    He became Captain of the Ranger and he well deserved it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yikes! That was one horrendous crash indeed.

      Delete
  7. When did "tour guide" become "Docent"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, man...I just read the name tags.

      To be fair though, it did appear that all of them had prior experience as serving sailors or airmen aboard that ship, so I'm willing to respect that and let them call themselves whatever they like.

      Delete
  8. Showed my son how to do that and other tricks during his scout trip to USS Yorktown earlier this year. Didn't get busted though.

    ReplyDelete
  9. A couple of years ago, I was with a few friends as we toured the USS Requin in Pittburgh. It was a self-guided tour, and as I had served in submarines, I was pointing out and explaining a lot of the details as we made our way through the boat. When we arrived in the control room, I spied the bank of alarm handles on one of the bulkheads. I pointed out the green-handled diving alarm. I explained what it was and what it was used for and then said: "You know, sometimes they leave the diving alarm hooked up and operational."

    I looked around and saw no one from the museum nearby. So I reached up and pulled the handle.

    "AAAAHHHOOOOOOOGAAAAAAA!"

    Yep, it still worked!

    I didn't get thrown off, but later in the tour, one of the docents - a young woman who had never been in the Navy, much less served on submarines - came by and told me I was moving too slow and holding up the tour. It seemed that my tour guidance and detailed explanations had drawn quite a crowd.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ahem. Teach a man to fish, er, drop boarding steps, er, whatever.

    I went back and reread that post and I recall mentioning where NOT to stand when dropping the steps. As you didn't complain, and didn't mention writhing about on the Midway's flight deck, that you positioned your, ahem, "jewels" out of harm's way.

    I am so proud of you Murph, even if the docents don't understand!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If nothing else, I do learn from other people's misfortunes.. Thanks for the warning..

      Delete