Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Operation Ranch Hand, West Virginia version

A couple of months ago, everyone around here got flyers attached to our doors from Asplundh, the big tree company that was contracted by the power company to clear tree branches away from the power lines that parallel our roads. Like everyone else, I checked the box that authorized them to trim back any limbs on the foliage in front of my house that might be a problem for the power lines. And I understand the need for this, so I didn't have a problem with it, until I came home the other day and saw that every tree, bush and shrub on my property that was alongside the road was brown and dead, or turning brown and dying. These assholes came along with a sprayer and just blasted everything that was green with a heavy-duty defoliant, and they killed everything that was growing on my property within ten feet of the roadside, to include two very nice black cherry trees that I was rather fond of.

WTF?!

Driving around, I see that I'm not the only one in the neighborhood that got the Agent Orange treatment. Almost anything growing under a power line in the area is now dead, especially on undeveloped lots. But MY lot is NOT undeveloped. I live here and I liked my greenery. I'm thinking that Asplundh needs to come on back here and make this right, and if they don't, that it'll at least by my right and duty to make them as unhappy as their negligence has made me. I put the call in to their offices today. We'll see what we'll see.

Two black cherry trees, now ex-trees, surrounded by some once-nice ivy. Thanks, Asplundh!


And in other, related news, Miss Belle's streak of not getting out ended today after three weeks of good behavior. I was down at the road talking to a driver for Asplundh--a nice fellow named: "Hey-don't-blame-me-I-don't-do-the-spraying", when suddenly Belle materialized beside me. Apparently she decided that if Dad was going to be talking to people in a truck, that she needed to be there, too. Nice thought, but now the "no escapes" clock has to start again, and she was doing so well!

14 comments:

  1. Yeah, I'd more than just a little pissed off if they deliberately killed a couple of my trees, especially fruit-bearing ones.

    It'll be interesting to see where belle made her break from.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She got out where the tree fell on the fence a few weeks back. Either she was able to bend it down again or else another falling limb hit it during this week-end's weather events. But it's fixed again.

      Delete
  2. From a different point of view, when you show up complaining about the spray damage, you'll have a bit more credibility. "Yeah, that guy there? He's got a huge German Shepherd that shows up outta nowhere! Don't want to piss him off.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It worked well in the land of the squatting slope. It works well in the land of flushing toilets. But if it was my land, I'd find a way to get payback. Even if it was simply go to to the office that authorized it and dump a drum of roundup on the lawn.

    I had a boss that I didn't like. It's strange how roundup keeps finding its way to the cemetery where he rests under dead sod. And how the surveillance cameras that the cemetery puts up to catch the bastard get shot out whenever a new dose is called for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ll
      i'm glad we are not enemies!

      Delete
  4. Fairly large difference between trimming and poisoning, especially if it came onto your private property, not just their easement. If the do not agree to replace the trees, including planting, with same size and species, it may be neighborhood class-action time. If they did not disclose what chemicals the used, in advance of the spraying, call Erin B. Did they spray near pregnant neighbors or livestock? Scummy behavior, probably illegal, especially if there was no reference to herbicides or defoliants on the permission documents.

    ReplyDelete
  5. never heard of them doing that . usually trim trees to just this side of death.
    herbicide will travel up to 5 miles and damage tomatoes, et cetera. so many plants are sensitive.

    get the neighbors to put in for replacement plantings.
    the employee seems to have received no training or else is unintelligent!
    as the commenter said above, hope no one is pregnant nearby.

    permission to trim is NOT permission to poison.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yeah, they 'owe' you... And poison without notification is NOT kosher... I'd be beating on them about that.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Poison and cutting of the biggest trees within 15 ft. of the lines.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Herbicide is definitely not the same as trimming, if it was without notification and permission it was quite possibly an illegal action depending on your zoning, agricultural, and water regulations. If, for example, you were an organic farm, their action would have just caused you to lose that label. Or, if you lived in a public water supply watershed, it would be a matter of some hefty fines against them. Not a joking matter.
    I am not surprised by which company it was, though I didn't realize their charming! behavior occurred outside New England.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Asplundh has pulled its shtick on Long Island. The town was revitalizing its downtown shopping district, and the Asplundh people simply cut down every tree that had lined the main street in the commercial district. One of the tree-hugger environmentalists put in a Freedom of Information Law request to the town, was denied the request, and then one of the local newspapers received a gratuitous leak, apparently from a town employee (or former employee) who had unrelated workplace issues. A bunch of mea culpas followed, a largely symbolic price adjustment was made in the Asplundh contract, and the taxpayers then underwrote the planting of new trees.

    ReplyDelete
  10. When we had a place where the power line went through the property we changed the trimming easement to that "all trimming must be mechanical with no chemical spraying".
    Too late for you now, but for the next time.
    Might be time to plant some kudzu around the power poles on your property.

    ReplyDelete