Monday, October 30, 2017

Can you handle another M1 Carbine post?

Well tough, because I found another one.

This World War Two vet is another US Carbine, M1, and it was made by the Winchester corporation in either late 1942 or early 1943.
It also has the undated "W" stamped barrel that Winchester guns came from the factory with, so the barrel is likely original to the rifle.
Not import marked, and not refinished...as a matter of fact, even though the barrel still rates a "2" on the gauge, the rifle has a fair bit of wear on it, even for a 70-something year old fighting tool. It's almost as if it didn't quietly retire from service at the end of World War Two and/or Korea...and it didn't.

In the 1960's, the City of Detroit purchased a number of these carbines for their police department, one of only two big cities to do this. They issued them to their officers and the carbines rode the trunks of police cruisers and spent time in armory racks until 187 of carbines were finally sold for surplus to Zanders Sporting Goods for $75.00 each according to the stories. (This also apparently included some rare Irwin Pederson-produced guns...sigh.) They were then offered to the public and snapped up quickly. I missed out back then but I've been looking for one ever since and I finally came across one at a decent price...actually less than Zanders likely sold it for back then.

And how do I know it's one of those? Simple. DPD carbines have two distinctive markings that set them apart from the rest of the 6,000,000 or so carbines out there. The first is the DPD precinct and rack number stamped on the heel of the stock:
11th Precinct, rack #7. Back in the 1960's, the 11th was at E. Davison and Conant, so the gun is an east-sider. As an old west-sider when I lived in Detroit, I guess I can learn to overlook that though.

The rifle also bears a DPD inventory number on the side of the receiver, just barely visible at the wood line. Detroit assigned numbers sequentially to all of their firearms back then.
The number is 14444, which puts it right at the end of the bloc of the known inventory numbers for the city's carbines: 14267 to 14452.

So this is one of those Detroit guns. Can't say 100% but she probably pulled riot duty in 1967 in addition to whatever else it was used for. Heck, maybe it even crossed paths with my Detroit PD-issued Smith and Wesson Model 10. The city sold these off back in the 1990's too, for $15.00 each to another wholesaler.

Haven't had a chance to shoot this critter yet, but that time's coming and a range report will follow. Meanwhile, looks like come the leftist revolution, I'm ready to head back to re-take Detroit in style.

Has a round bolt. Only two of my carbines have round bolts. I wish this old gun could talk, because it's probably got some stories.

20 comments:

  1. Hey Murphy;

    I don't mind M1 carbine post, they are a very cool rifle and I like the historical aspect of them.

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    Replies
    1. I love the little suckers. No downside to them.

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    2. Hey Murph;

      Off the wall question, I remember IDI selling M1 carbines in the 80's and 90's, truth be told, I haven't looked into them. They still doing that? And yes it is on my bucket list guns to pick up one for my collection:)

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  2. I always wanted one of those!

    And I remember when you could get a very good one for about $100....

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, I had an FFL then. Ordered several for friends. Wish I'd bought a dozen or so.

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    2. What's a good condition one go for these days?

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    3. If you can find one for under $800, dive on it. Nice ones go north of a grand easy.

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  3. Hate to be that guy, but come the leftist revolution, you, Murph, and Miss Belle are gonna have your hands (and paws) plenty full down in the Big Easy.

    Speaking of which, Hornady offers a load for.30 Carbine in their Critical Defense line, and Buffalo Bore has a high-velocity JHP load too. Granted, you've probably got plenty of ammo already (and, who are we kidding, you're probably gonna have trouble deciding which gun to grab) but never hurts to be prepared, right?

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  4. Honestly, the carbines in my inventory will be issued to people that I know and trust but who do not own guns. In this case it's good that the rifles are small and light with no real recoil because most of those people are young ladies that I have come to know down here. Yep--gonna train me up an Amazon army and arm them with M1, AR and SKS carbines. I predict that we'll own a fair chunk of this city before the fight is over.

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  5. Amazing knowledge of what you are handling, helps to weed-out bad deals from unscrupulous sellers, and educates those of us that are looking at these guns...
    Thanks again, Murphy.

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  6. Nice!
    I don't have the time, energy or available resources so I have to do my collecting vicariously through you!

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  7. Excellent little rifle. I own a National Postal Meter one I got for $350, tax inc. and a milled sight I had to buy for it (it had no rear sight and was for $299!)

    As for high performance ammo, heck I think a 110 gr SP at 2000 fps is totally fine. If you need more power, get a bigger gun!

    And the Detroit PD... they were far ahead on the 'Patrol Rifle' concept! Most PDs just used shotguns with cylinder bore and plain 00 buck that wouldn't group inside a humanoid target at 20 yards!

    Great find.

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  8. You paid HOW MUCH??? for this gun? I love the M1.
    The Garand is my all time favorite gun.

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    Replies
    1. Shockingly little, especially considering that it's a Winchester, one of the rarer manufacturers.

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  9. Nice find, and you can bet it does have stories!!!

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  10. Very nice acquisition indeed.

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  11. You done good, kid!

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  12. Anonymous10:42 PM

    Great find

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