Thursday, March 19, 2015

Plane Porn


While leaving the airport after flying on Monday, we stopped by the gate on the military side of the field on the off-chance that the Air Police guard at the gate might let us near the nicely-restored North American F-86 Sabre jet that's now on display just inside that gate.
And much thanks to the A.P., he let us in to see the plane. (He had to think about it for a minute, but I guess we seemed harmless at first glance.)
This one is an F-86H, Serial #52-2058N. In it's earlier days, it was assigned to the West Virginia Air Guard and it pulled duty right here at Martinsburg with the 167th Fighter squadron (Today the 167th Airlift Wing). The 167th flew these from 1957-1961, when they switched from jet fighters to C-119 transports. Ironically, the base at Martinsburg had been specially selected and expanded in 1955 just to accomodate the jet fighters, which the 167th lost when is was transitioned into an airlift unit.
This Sabre was one of the ones that was used here during that time, along with it's brother, 52-2044, which now sits in considerably poorer shape down at Front Royal, VA.
This one's in great shape, though. The tires are all up to pressure, and I beleive that it even stall has it's engine--turbines are still visible down the intake and up the tailpipe.
This one needs to fly. And I'd be happy to kick it's tires and light it's fire.
This one still has six .50 machine guns, unlike the slightly later F-86H on display at the Old Soldiers' Home in Washington, DC.
Found me a button. Thinking of my pal, OldAFSarge here, because he tempts me to pushing such buttons.
I was gonna press it, but if anything were to happen as a result, it would probably get that nice young A.P. in trouble. So for his sake, I resisted the temptation...this time.
Any idea what these three slots are for? The other H-model has them, too. They are only on the left side.
Max take-off weight: 22,100lbs. Max speed: 692mph. Max climb rate: 12,900 feet per minute. Ceiling: 50,800 feet. Fuel consumption: off the charts. Number built: 9,860. Number owned by me: 0. (Very sad.)
Yeah, this old warrior wants to fly. Just look at it and you can tell. I wonder if they'd notice if I switched it out for my Cessna 172, just for a day or so over the week-end?

Edited: OK, per this picture of the "skinless" F-86H at Wright Patterson, the aircraft's power inverter is behind that vented panel referenced above.

13 comments:

  1. "I wonder if they'd notice if I switched it out for my Cessna 172, just for a day or so over the week-end?"

    It's worth a try. Give it a shot, and let us know how it worked out. Or the date of your trial, whichever comes first. :)

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  2. That is one sweet looking bird.

    (I need to figure out where the boarding ladder is...)

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    1. That's what I thought too.

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  3. Boarding ladder is two recessed steps with hinged covers on each side, visible in pictures above and below canopy release button pic. Each one is at the bottom of the black lines coming down from the cockpit. Again, tempting, but the A.P. would probably get yelled at.

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    1. That's what I thought, but if you don't try it...

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  4. I think the slots are to vent smoke/gasses from the gun compartment...

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    1. That's my guess, but there aren't ones for the right side guns unless they're ducted over.

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    2. I believe they are for radios and comm gear - it's been a while.

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  5. Hey Murphy,

    Wonder if you can stuff Murphy and Belle behind you in the canopy?

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  6. Avionics cooling

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    Replies
    1. Or that might be where the LOX is stored.

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  7. Great pictures Thanks for sharing

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  8. I wonder if you would consider sending me some higher resolution copies of these photos. I am considering making an RC version with an electric ducted fan for power. Detail shots like these will help a great deal.

    Jim
    butler_james(at)msn.com

    ReplyDelete